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Do net.Conn unit test using net.Pipe in Golang

To create unit tests for net.Conn with net.Pipe in Golang, you can follow these steps:

  1. Import the required packages:
import (
	"net"
	"testing"
)
  1. Create a function that will be used as a test case for the net.Conn unit tests. This function should accept a net.Conn as an argument and perform any necessary operations on it, such as writing to or reading from the connection.

  2. In your main test function, create a net.Pipe using the net.Pipe() function. This will create a pair of in-memory network connections that can be used to simulate a real network connection for testing purposes.

  3. Pass one end of the net.Pipe to the test case function that you created in step 2. This will allow you to test the behavior of the net.Conn with the simulated network connection.

  4. Add any necessary assertions to your test function to verify that the net.Conn is behaving as expected. For example, you might want to verify that the data written to the connection is correctly read back from the connection.

Here's an example of a basic net.Conn unit test using net.Pipe in Golang:

func TestNetConn(t *testing.T) {
	// Create a net.Pipe
	conn1, conn2 := net.Pipe()

	// Pass one end of the net.Pipe to the test case function
	testNetConn(t, conn1)

	// Close the connections
	conn1.Close()
	conn2.Close()
}

func testNetConn(t *testing.T, conn net.Conn) {
	// Write to the connection
	_, err := conn.Write([]byte("Hello, world!"))
	if err != nil {
		t.Errorf("Error writing to connection: %v", err)
	}

	// Read from the connection
	buf := make([]byte, 14)
	_, err = conn.Read(buf)
	if err != nil {
		t.Errorf("Error reading from connection: %v", err)
	}

	// Verify that the data written to the connection was correctly read back
	if string(buf) != "Hello, world!" {
		t.Errorf("Unexpected data read from connection. Expected 'Hello, world!', got '%s'", string(buf))
	}
}

Simple:

server, client := net.Pipe()
go func() {
  // Do some stuff
  server.Close()
}()

// Do some stuff
client.Close()

Another:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "io/ioutil"
    "log"
    "net"
)

func main() {
    r, w := net.Pipe()
    go func() {
        w.Write([]byte("haha"))
        w.Close()
    }()
    b, err := ioutil.ReadAll(r)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatalf(err.Error())
    }
    fmt.Println(string(b))
}

Or:

func TestConn(t *testing.T) {
    message := "Hi there!\n"

    go func() {
        conn, err := net.Dial("tcp", ":3000")
        if err != nil {
            t.Fatal(err)
        }
        defer conn.Close()

        if _, err := fmt.Fprintf(conn, message); err != nil {
            t.Fatal(err)
        }
    }()

    l, err := net.Listen("tcp", ":3000")
    if err != nil {
        t.Fatal(err)
    }
    defer l.Close()
    for {
        conn, err := l.Accept()
        if err != nil {
            return
        }
        defer conn.Close()

        buf, err := ioutil.ReadAll(conn)
        if err != nil {
            t.Fatal(err)
        }

        fmt.Println(string(buf[:]))
        if msg := string(buf[:]); msg != message {
            t.Fatalf("Unexpected message:\nGot:\t\t%s\nExpected:\t%s\n", msg, message)
        }
        return // Done
    }

}
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